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Kraft Rolls Out a ‘Farmers’-Market-On-Wheels’ for the Food Bank

Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano is fighting hunger one mile at a time with the gift of a new Kraft Mobile Pantry truck.  The refrigerated vehicle will hit the road to bring a fresh produce to low-income areas in the community, expanding the reach of the Food Bank while delivering fresh fruit and vegetables.

 This truck is part of a nationwide fleet being rolled out by Kraft Foods Foundation (now known as Mondelēz International Foundation) and Feeding America, to reach those hardest hit with food insecurity. The mobile pantry will be used as part of the Food Bank’s Community Produce Program to expand the service area to West Contra Costa and Solano county to bring approximately 20 pounds per person of four to seven types of produce to three distribution sites per day serving 50-200 people, depending upon the site and location, at a time when the need has never been greater.

 Here in Contra Costa and Solano counties, 1 in 4 of our neighbors face food insecurity.  We’re seeing more residents reaching out for food assistance than ever before.   The Kraft Mobile Pantry could not come at a better time to help us increase the number of clients and areas we are able to reach.

 Fighting hunger is not new for Kraft.  The company has partnered with Feeding America for decades to do just that.  The mobile pantry program is one of many programs making a difference in communities where the company’s employees live and work.

Special Program Sees to Nutrition Needs of Seniors

Originally posted in the Vacaville Reporter: I remember reading a quote from a political leader that said you can best evaluate a society by how well it takes care of its children and its elderly. From my experience with Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano programs, I am convinced our society can do better. The huge number of children and senior citizens coming to us for food assistance says that our social programs are not doing what they should.

One of the first direct distributions the Food Bank established was the Senior Food Program. In the early 1980s, it was obvious that Social Security benefits were not adequate to support an individual in the Bay Area. Seniors had to make difficult decisions about housing, medical care and the basics of life. When stories started coming back to us about people eating less to save money, we knew we should try to make a difference with the food donations available to us.

Beginning with 50 people, we have grown the Senior Food Program to 3,300 seniors at 28 sites in Solano and Contra Costa counties. Last year, more than 1.3 million pounds of food went to the senior citizens who participate in this program.

We are also working with those who are part of the Senior Food Program because they may be eligible to receive Cal Fresh (formerly food stamps) benefits. The people this program serves recognize that their health depends on their diet. If they are going to avoid significant medical costs, good food is important to their health.

I am grateful the community support we receive allows the Food Bank to make a difference in the lives of senior citizens.

If you are a senior who could use food assistance, or know someone who can, please go to www.foodbankccs.org/get-help/senior-food-program.html or call (toll free) (855) 309-3663.

 

Helping Put Healthy Food on the Table

Juan Orozco teamed up with Liliana Sandoval from the San Francisco and Marin Food Bank

By Juan Orozco, CalFresh Outreach Coordinator for Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano: In an effort to educate and raise public awareness about CalFresh, the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano is partnering with other Bay Area food banks to provide CalFresh Outreach at the San Francisco Mexican Consulate.  The goal is to increase participation in federal food assistance programs, thereby helping to reduce food insecurity for people struggling to make ends meet.  Studies have shown one of the primary reasons why low–income households who qualify for CalFresh are not participating in the program is lack of eligibility information.  In collaboration with the San Francisco Mexican Consulate we hope that we can encourage more legal immigrants to apply for the nutrition benefits of CalFresh.  CalFresh helps millions of Americans in need to put nutritious food on their table.

If you would like to learn more about CalFresh eligibility or need assistance with the application process, please visit www.foodbankccs.org/calfresh.

Will Workout for Turkey

Guest post by Laura Collins, Special Events Assistant: For the first time in many years, I did not host Thanksgiving. I didn’t have to prepare dishes days beforehand. I didn’t have to wake up at the crack of dawn to pull the turkey from the cooler full of brine, or get the deep fryer ready, or pesto rub my free range bird, or do whatever the turkey de jour was for that year. So when I got up that morning, well, I just felt so aimless, I ended up burrowing into my sofa watching the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade just to feel like it was a holiday. LAME.

I made a promise to myself that I would never do that again, that I would do something to make my Thanksgiving morning meaningful, I mean that’s what it’s all about, right? The 65 people that turned out for Fit 2 the Core’s Turkey Day Workout made it meaningful this year. Talk about burn baby burn! These motivated folks spent their Thanksgiving morning torching calories, boosting their metabolism and put themselves through one hard core workout so that when they sat down to their feast, they earned it! (I just remembered, I did get up a couple of times to get more coffee – that had to burn at least, what, 24 calories??)

Tim and the Crew at Fit to the Core, provided this opportunity to do something healthy for participants, and they also provided the opportunity to make it doubly meaningful by helping others in the community. Anyone could participate that morning, with the gift of a minimum of a $10.00 gift certificate from a local grocery store which would donated to the Food Bank to help put holiday meals and nutritious food on the table of a family in need.

Thanks Tim, Donnie, Megan, Kelley and all who joined in that morning, way to do some serious damage control to hunger! And thanks for inspiring this couch potato, next year I’ll be up and about putting the giving back in Thanksgiving!

If you need motivation over the next year, don’t forget to check out what’s happening at the Food Bank, we always have ways to get involved, if you are already a hunger fighter, share your stories!

New Vistas Christian School In Martinez California Helps Feed The Hungry

 

When the Food Bank barrels were delivered, Rachel, one of our students called a local Nob Hill Grocery, Walmart, and Ace Hardware store, to ask if we could place barrels in their businesses. They were all extremely cooperative and the public response to our barrels was overwhelming. In the three weeks that we held our drive we collected from students, and participating businesses around 1,500 lbs. of food, as well as a $100.00 check donated to the Food Bank by a generous donor. We would like to say a big “Thank You,” to all of the businesses and people in the community who supported our efforts.

Hunger Speaks to a Global Audience

Originally posted in the Vacaville Reporter: The Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano is a member of Feeding America, a national network of food banks. Our service is local in Solano and Contra Costa counties, but we are also part of a national effort dedicated to bringing an end to hunger. Through this national work we find connections that are inspiring.

We were recently contacted by representatives of Elanco, a Greenfield, Ind.-based business that develops products to improve the health and food productivity of farm animals. A group of their international leadership was at a symposium in Napa, and Elanco’s corporate culture meant that a breakout session included a trip to the Food Bank so they could learn about the CalFresh (food stamp) program.

We discussed our overall work at the food bank and specifically the outreach we do trying to enroll more people in the CalFresh program.

The Elanco folks were given a WalMart gift card and went to the local store to try to buy food for their family for a week on a CalFresh budget. Although they shopped for values to stretch their dollars, they realized the challenges people face when they are using the CalFresh program.

The Elanco folks are scientists, well-educated, intelligent and knowledgeable about food and nutrition. It was a transformation for them to realize they could not have the food they wanted, but had to make tough choices about the food they needed and the nutritional value they wanted to reach.

Part of the work of both our Food Bank and Feeding America is to help people understand why hunger exists.

Because of the culture Elanco has, we now have 40 knowledgeable people talking to their friends about what the food stamp program means and the challenges people at risk of hunger face every day.

 

USF Grad Students Distribute Food

Guest post by Adrienne Sommer-Locey – I don’t know what I was expecting when my team signed up to bag food for the Vallejo distribution with Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano. Times are tough, and friendly faces can be hard to find; you never know what you will encounter at an assistance program. With an open heart and willing mind, my community service team and I carpooled to Vallejo to share our talents and learn from our experience.

Upon our arrival at the Community Center in Vallejo, we hopped out of the car and met the other volunteers, a team of high school students. There was a little separation between the two groups in the beginning as we introduced ourselves and signed in, but as soon as the truck with food pulled up there was work to do and no time to be shy! In the blink of an eye, tables were put out, pallets were set up, and an assembly line was formed. We all had our marching orders as to what goes in each bag, and instantly got to work with all the hustle we could muster.

In our Undergraduate program, we studied classical management techniques, the history of the evolution of organizational structures, and beyond. Learning these facts by rote will drill the concepts into your head, but the experience at the food bank brought it to life! We were constantly seeking the “one best way” a la Frederick Taylor, testing to see how to make the flow of the product move more efficiently. We specialized in our tasks and the products we handled as Adam Smith suggested in the Wealth of Nations and which Ford perfected in the automobile industry. We employed friendly peer pressure to goad each other on in a sort of reversed “soldiering” to go faster and be a stronger team member. Each person played their part, and the work was done in record time.

Once the bags were created, we shifted gears and got ready to meet the people who would be receiving them. Some of us took the role of greeting people and distributing bags, others took a role of maintaining the bags and keeping the supply chain rolling. I was part of the latter group, but I got an opportunity to meet and talk to the recipients as well. The most difficult realization was that the people we were helping were just like me. This was not some remote group in foreign lands suffering from malnutrition like you see in ads on TV. These are our fellow Americans, our neighbors, our friends. The truth is the face of poverty is our face, and their struggles are no more remote from us than our own shadow.

It can crush your spirit to see so many people struggling to get by day to day. Instead of a painful confrontation however, the work was done with a generous heart, the food gladly given and received, and everyone, including the recipients, was friendly and positive,. They were happy for the relief, and we were happy to assist them. There was no pity or resentment, just a real sense of compassion and gratitude. It felt good not just to do for others, but to be a part of a team working for a positive goal. My day at the Vallejo food bank was unforgettable; an experience I hope to repeat and share with many others.