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Tag ‘ Senior Food Program ’

Senior Food Program Expands Reach

Originally posted on the Vacaville Reporter: Did you know more than half of the households served by the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano have had to choose between paying for medicine/medical care or food? For seniors living solely on social security this is especially true. Through the Senior Food Program, people 55 and over receive nutritionally balanced bags of food so they may not have to make those tough decisions.

Thanks to community support the Food Bank can help ease the burden for senior citizens.

The canned goods, bread and produce seniors are able to receive have a market value of approximately $50 per month and allow them to stretch their budgets to pay for medicine, rent, utilities and other necessities.

Since 2010, the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano has seen a 90% increase in the number of people we serve through the Senior Food Program. One of the ways we have been able to reach more seniors is by increasing the number of low-income senior housing complexes we provide food to.

Many low-income seniors who reside in senior housing are unable to travel to food distribution sites due to health issues and a lack of transportation.

If a senior housing complex can provide someone to pick up the food at the Food Bank warehouses in either Concord or Fairfield, Food Bank staff will help them load their vehicle.  The food is then taken back to the complex and volunteers, usually a few of residents along with their service coordinator, bag it in the common room. This provides an opportunity for the seniors to enjoy some social time while they are working and doing something useful for their fellow residents.

Those who are able can come down and get their groceries when the bags are ready, and for those who aren’t, their bags are delivered to them. We are happy to provide this service twice a month to the many low-income seniors who are unable to travel to an open distribution site.

In 2014, we added two new senior food distribution sites in Solano County, Heritage Commons in Dixon and Woodcreek Senior Commons in Fairfield.  They join Vacaville Senior Manor which has been with the food bank several years.  In Contra Costa County, Berrellessa Palms in Martinez joined the food bank in 2014 along with Golden Oak Manor in Oakley, Sycamore Place in Danville, and Columbia Park Manor in Pittsburg.

Beginning in February, 2015 Senior Manor Apartments in Fairfield will add additional seniors to the Senior Food Program at the Food Bank.  We are happy to provide this service twice a month to the many low- income seniors who are unable to travel to an open distribution site.

Learn how you can help seniors at www.foodbankccs.org/seniorhunger.

Seniors Should Not Have To Chose Between Food And Medicine

 

Originally posted on the Vacaville Reporter: Can you imagine living in your car in your retirement?  That’s a reality Dollie, a 73 year old woman from Fairfield, faced recently. In poor health and with very limited income, Dollie could no longer keep up with the rising costs of her food, gas, medications, and rent, and she faced some desperate choices.

At an age when many working Americans are planning their retirement vacations, or spending more time with their grandchildren, Dollie was homeless. She worked all her life, but her limited income and health benefits provided through our safety net programs for seniors were simply inadequate.

Dollie found help and shared her story with the National Senior Citizens Law Center who gave the Food Bank permission to retell her story. It is important for these types of stories to be told as many of our seniors don’t have enough to make ends meet.

With their limited income, more than half of the households served by the Food Bank have had to choose between paying for medicine, medical care, or food.

In fact, 1 in 7 of all people 65 and over are living in poverty, according to the U.S. Census Supplemental Poverty Measure. That’s 6.4 million of our parents and grandparents struggling daily to put food on the table, pay rent and afford the medical care they need.

According to a report released by the National Foundation to End Senior Hunger, from the start of the recession in 2007 to 2012, the number of older people threatened by hunger has jumped 49 percent.

No senior should have to choose between food and the medicine they need.

With your help, the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano is able to provide groceries to more than 3,000 senior households each month through the Senior Food Program. Seniors 55 and over receive nutritionally balanced bags of food so they may not have to make those tough decisions.

For more information on how you can help the Food Bank provide nutrition to seniors, please visit www.foodbankccs.org/seniorhunger. To find a Senior Food Program site near you, visit http://www.foodbankccs.org/get-help/senior-food-program.html or call 855-309-FOOD.

 

 

Food Bank Supplements Where Social Security Doesn’t Provide

Originally posted on the Vacaville Reporter: Whenever I think about the 3,000 people the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano provides food to through our Senior Food Program, I know that part of the reason they need food is because they depend on the Social Security program.  We now understand that Social Security is not supposed to be the sole source of income for a retired person, but many retirees thought it was their retirement plan.  If you look at the total number of retirees receiving Social Security, it is only 38% of the total income those people receive.  Of the entire group, 52% of married couples and 74% of unmarried individuals have over 50% of their income coming from Social Security.  When you consider that group of people, 22% of the married people and 47% of the individuals get 90% of their income from Social Security.  There is a wide range in how much people depend on Social Security with some depending on the program a great deal.

The reason people need to come to the Senior Food Program is because the average Social Security payment is $1,294 per month.  If an individual was getting 90% of their income from Social Security they would have a total income of less than $17,000 a year and a married couple would earn just over $31,000.  Where can they find an apartment they can afford?  Where do they cut their cost when medical issues hit them with copay costs?

Even people who live in subsidized housing face these challenges.  Even people who pay on a sliding scale can pay $800 a month.  In talking to someone we partner with at a subsidized senior residence, she reminded me that most of the people they serve are unmarried (more widows than widowers).  She spoke about one person who only had $20 for her food budget after she met all her living expenses.  Several of the people who live in their residence had made retirement plans but lost most of what they had set aside when the market crashed.  People who had lived in the community their whole lives saw their income fall so that they were no longer able to pay taxes and maintenance costs on their home.  The plans they made failed because of circumstances beyond their control.  Now they are trying to live on what Social Security provides.

The area people can cut costs is the food they buy, so the Senior Food Program makes a real difference in their lives.  We do not provide all the food a person needs, but seniors receive bread, fruit, vegetables and canned food.  Twice a month we are able to help people get just a little bit more.  Senior citizens are proud people who do not want to take charity.  People have worked their whole lives to be independent, but their world has changed.  Social Security does not give people enough income to buy the healthy food a senior deserves.

Mildred Celebrates Her 97th Birthday with the Food Bank

By Meg Zentner, Senior Food Program Coordinator: Mildred was born on April 9, 1917 in Stockton. She spent her childhood in a tiny town outside Tracy and someplace called Fireball. Her father worked for Standard Oil and in 1929 when she was 12 the family moved to Brentwood, where she has lived ever since.

mildredShe has been married twice and has no children, but is very close to her nephew and his kids. Early in her first marriage she traveled around with her husband who was an agricultural state inspector. When he returned from the service at the end of WWII they bought a walnut farm in Brentwood from her father in-law where she has lived ever since. They farmed it together until her husband passed away. She worked as a volunteer for the Red Cross, and later ran the crafts program at the original Brentwood Senior Center. Mildred started volunteering at the Senior Food Program site in Brentwood 3 months after its inception in 1981 and has been there ever since. Mildred still drives and lives independently on her walnut farm. She is an awesome human being. As I told the volunteers at her birthday party today, “When I grow up I want to be just like Mil”.

To find out how you can make friends and have fun with the Food Bank, visit www.foodbankccs.org/gethelp.

Special Program Sees to Nutrition Needs of Seniors

Originally posted in the Vacaville Reporter: I remember reading a quote from a political leader that said you can best evaluate a society by how well it takes care of its children and its elderly. From my experience with Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano programs, I am convinced our society can do better. The huge number of children and senior citizens coming to us for food assistance says that our social programs are not doing what they should.

One of the first direct distributions the Food Bank established was the Senior Food Program. In the early 1980s, it was obvious that Social Security benefits were not adequate to support an individual in the Bay Area. Seniors had to make difficult decisions about housing, medical care and the basics of life. When stories started coming back to us about people eating less to save money, we knew we should try to make a difference with the food donations available to us.

Beginning with 50 people, we have grown the Senior Food Program to 3,300 seniors at 28 sites in Solano and Contra Costa counties. Last year, more than 1.3 million pounds of food went to the senior citizens who participate in this program.

We are also working with those who are part of the Senior Food Program because they may be eligible to receive Cal Fresh (formerly food stamps) benefits. The people this program serves recognize that their health depends on their diet. If they are going to avoid significant medical costs, good food is important to their health.

I am grateful the community support we receive allows the Food Bank to make a difference in the lives of senior citizens.

If you are a senior who could use food assistance, or know someone who can, please go to www.foodbankccs.org/get-help/senior-food-program.html or call (toll free) (855) 309-3663.

 

Stories from the Creek, Part 1

Guest post by John VanLandingham, Food Bank volunteer: Every month, approximately 100 people appear at St.Paul’s Episcopal Church in Walnut Creek to receive free food distributions from the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano counties. Many of those are collecting for more than one person. Here are some of their stories.

 “I’m here because of low old-age pension. Every year my costs go up.”

Thaddeus, 90, Pleasant Hill

Thaddeus waited at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church’s parking lot in Walnut Creek for a friend while holding a couple of bags full of groceries. His bags contained fresh fruit, meat, bread, canned goods and some other staples this month.

Thaddeus was among the approximately 110 persons receiving food donations from Contra Costa-Solano Food Bank volunteers, many of them elderly, some disabled.

“Thaddeus is my biblical name. I speak French, German, Italian, Russian,” he said with an accent lingering from the five years he says he lived in France.

The 90-year-old former translator (who says he can read many literary classics in their original language) has been coming to the monthly Food Bank distribution for about six months.

“I lost my job at 65,” the Pleasant Hill resident said. “I’m here because of low old-age pension. Every year my costs are going up. Now I don’t have enough money for food and my living expenses. When you get old, they don’t care any more. It’s very cruel,” he said as he gave one of his bags of food to his friend who came to help.

Thaddeus explained that he does live with a family in Pleasant Hill.

For more information on our programs and services, please visit the Give Help page of our website.

The Different Faces of Hunger

Every day I am more and more surprised by how many people need our help.  Every month the Food Bank helps feed 132,000 people, an immense number by any standards. Who is the face of hunger and what brings each one of our clients to our distributions? When looking at the statistics I was shocked to see that 28% of the clients the Food Bank serves are children. If one parent loses their job this not only affects them but their children and others in the household. While school-aged children often receive lunch at school many times this is their only meal of the day. Talk to teachers and you will find out that they all have at least one student who goes home to an empty dinner table.

Another staggering statistic is how many seniors are in need of food assistance.  As Social Security benefits continue to be cut, many low income seniors are being asked to live on less and less. Meanwhile, prices of housing, food, and utilities keep rising.  For many seniors, a nutritious balanced meal is a luxury.

To serve these populations, the Food Bank has different programs. The Farm 2 Kids program provides produce on a weekly basis to nearly 9,000 children who then take the fruits and vegetables home to their families. For younger children ages 4-5 there is the Food For Children program which provides a monthly box of nutritious, kid-friendly food as well as a bag of perishable items. Low income seniors on a tight budget can join the Senior Food Program and receive a bag of canned and fresh items twice a month.

With the generous help of our supporters, the Food Bank is able to not only help people in need, but to target the special populations who need it most. As you take action this Hunger Action Month, keep in mind the many different individuals you are helping in so many different ways.