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Community Partnerships Provide Vital Holiday Meals

During the holiday season, people think of gifts, food and family.  Families gather together with the holiday meal being a main part of the celebration.  It is also a time we give presents to each other, sharing with others to show we care for our family and friends.  But the holidays are an especially difficult time for the families served by the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano.  People who need help from us throughout the year struggle as they try to make the holidays a special time for their family.

We at the Food Bank are lucky we live in a community that wants to help.  The Food Bank has been working for nearly forty years to make the holidays a happier time for the families we serve in our community.  We begin our planning in August by purchasing the food we will need for the holiday baskets put together by the agencies we serve.  We work with local food pantries and soup kitchens to determine who they will serve and what they will need from us during the holidays.  We are able to provide fresh fruit and vegetables as well as canned food and turkeys at no cost to the agency.  We raise money so we can buy grocery gift certificates that allow families with limited cooking facilities to obtain the food they need for their holiday meal.  Working with the pantries and soup kitchens in our community, we helped provide 14,000 meals to people last year, and more than 26,600 baskets went to families in need.

The holiday time is the busiest of all at the Food Bank, but we are able to do this work because the community gives.  We have collection barrels in local grocery stores.  Businesses and schools organize food drives.  Scout troops, faith communities, swim teams and motorcycle riders from our local refineries collect food and raise funds.  The number of drives increases every year, but we have nearly 800 locations where people can donate food to their neighbors.  We must receive this community support because we need to distribute over 1.7 million pounds of food and over 900 turkeys during the holiday season.

You have helped make the holiday brighter for the families we serve every year because the community gives generously.  Our committed volunteers help to sort and box the donated food we receive so that the generosity of the community during the holiday season continues to provide for the people we serve into the new year.  Because the community gives so generously, we are able to make a difference in the holiday season and throughout the year.

Proof of Community Care is Clear in the Audit

Originally posted in the Vacaville Reporter: In spite of what we think when we hear the word, having an audit done is not a negative thing.  As a charitable organization, the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano knows we should have outside experts evaluate the way we manage our financial affairs.  We want those we ask to give us food and money to know that we are doing the work they want to support.  Our audits show community members that we are accomplishing the important work people want to see done.

As we are doing the final review of our audit for 2014, it is very helpful to me to look at what we have accomplished.   We establish goals each year and June 30 is when we stop the clock and look at how we have done.   In the last fiscal year, we distributed over 20 million pounds of food and half of those pounds were fresh produce.  Our administrative and fund development costs are less than 4% of our budget.  We have reason to be proud we are running an efficient organization that is meeting the needs of hungry people in our community.

But when I consider where the support comes from that makes our work possible, I am even more proud of the work we do.  If I look at a random list of contacts I have had in the past few months, I see amazing community connections.  We receive support from Rotary Clubs, Lions Clubs, Kiwanis Clubs, League of Women Voters, Valero, Shell, Tesoro, Chevron, Janssen, Safeway, Whole Foods, Genentech, and Walmart.

The Food Bank gets help from Solano and Contra Costa County employees, Contra Costa Bar Association (and a bunch of law firms), Realtors in Motion, the County Library, St. Mary’s College, Prophet, the Rossmoor Harvest Festival and St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church’s crab feed.  Food, money and volunteers come from Stanley Middle School, Hercules Middle School, Valhalla School, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Pacific Service Credit Union, Bloomingdales and Forma Gym.

We also receive over half our financial support from individuals.  Some people donate once a year, some people donate every month.  People ask friends to give money to the Food Bank instead of buying them birthday or wedding gifts.  Parents bring their children to the Food Bank warehouse so they can give us the money they raised in their neighborhood.  There is a sense of community that comes from helping each other.

Our audit is a time we look at what we have done, and it shows me that we are part of a community that cares for their neighbors.  When we put together efforts to provide food to those in need, we know that we can count on the strong support provided by our community.  We are able to make a difference because we are part of a community that knows they can work with the Food Bank to get healthy food to their neighbors in need.

Community Members are Connected in a Variety of Ways to Our Efforts to Feed People

Originally posted in The Vacaville Reporter:  Nearly four decades ago, when I started working at the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano I didn’t realize how large a role the organization would play in the community. As the years have passed, the Food Bank has become a well-recognized resource for helping those in need in the community. Because of that recognition, people lend their support to our mission to end hunger.

Community members are connected in a variety of ways to our efforts to feed people. For those who have the time to do hands-on work, we ask volunteers to sort food, bag produce and assist with our remote distributions. Distributing nearly twenty million pounds of food means we need to address logistical issues, including trucking, food storage and running efficient distribution programs. For all these tasks, we depend on volunteers.

We also rely on volunteers to help us obtain the food we need. Food drives are organized year round because hunger exists year round. Our food drives range from the major effort organized by the National Association of Letter Carriers every May or the Boy Scouts each November to food collections done by individuals. Gardeners grow extra vegetables in their back yard to share with their neighbors in need. Businesses organize food collections as a way to give back to their community. We receive over a million pounds of food every year from a generous community, while we engage people in helping end hunger.

We are also lucky that a generous community helps us raise the money we need to distribute the food we gather. Gathering the support we need also goes from large to small, with the total effort being important to our work. We organize events like golf tournaments, motorcycle runs, or Uncorked, a food and wine afternoon at GV Cellars in Fairfield on August 3. Events like Uncorked bring people together to help the Food Bank, creating a sense of community around a common cause. Giving to charitable causes is an important part of many people’s lives, and they know the Food Bank plays an important role in improving our community.

Many people learn the habit of giving early in life. I talked to someone yesterday who shared the story of their nine year old daughter who sold wrist bands to her friends to raise money to buy food for the Food Bank. Her parents and grandparents matched the money she raised, helping her buy more food to bring to the Food Bank. When she brought the food to us, she saw how her donation became part of a bigger effort to help. Our work is possible because we connect with those in the community who want to see an end to hunger.

Annual Report Change Shows Growth of Food Bank, Local Need

Originally posted in The Vacaville Reporter: Someone was going through some old materials they found in storage and brought me an annual report from 1998, sixteen years ago. Annual reports and financial audits are snapshots in time that define how an organization is providing service in the community, so it was pretty astounding to see where we were then versus where we are now.

I was amazed at how much we have grown as an organization. In 1998, we had 32 employees; today we have 63. (Eleven of the people who worked for us in 1998 still are with us today.) We have been able to increase our services because the support we receive from the community has increased significantly. As an example, in 1998 the support we receive from individuals was one million dollars and we now receive five million dollars annually.

The Food Bank needs that increased support because we have expanded our work to meet the need in ways we never dreamed we would be doing in 1998. At that time, we had our Senior Food Program, Food Assistance Program and Food for Children program as the only direct service we provided in the community. Because of the collaborative work of food banks through the California Association of Food Banks, we now have access to supply of fresh produce through packing sheds in the San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys that’s only limited by the amount of support we receive to purchase it. Because this fresh food is available to us, we established the Farm 2 Kids program that distributes food to students in low-income schools. In the past two years, we developed the Community Produce Program that takes fresh produce to over fifty distribution sites throughout Contra Costa and Solano counties. I would have been surprised in 1998 to know that someday we would provide over ten million pounds of fresh fruit and vegetables in one year to low-income people in our community.

The reason we must keep focused on our work is because the need continues to grow. We were serving 58,000 people a month is 1998 and have seen that number increase to 149,000 today. At some of our Food Assistance Program sites for example, we have seen the number of people coming increase fourfold. We are sending two trucks filled with food to some of the sites we serve because nearly 600 people come for the food we give. With our increased efficiency, staff and community support, we are able to meet that high demand and outreach to those who may not know help with food is available.

I am proud of the programs we have maintained and strengthened, as well as the new programs we have initiated. Everything we do, from distributing more fresh produce to helping enroll people in CalFresh is dedicated to getting food to those in need. Our supporters should be proud as well. Because of them, we are able to be of service to the increased number of people who need us.

Public Works to Provide Food

public works

The Contra Costa County Public Works Department decided to host a food and money drive to help the Food Bank kick off the summer – a time when need is high, but donated food runs low. This county department collects money for the Food Bank during the holidays but they feel it is important to collect food and money at other times of the year. Congratulations on a fantastic drive of 463 pounds of food and over $1,300 which equates to 3,010 meals!

A Fairy Tale Food Drive

Employees of the Disney store at Sun Valley Mall were inspired to hold a food drive after volunteering at the Food Bank and learning about the need for food in their community. So far they have collected a fantastic 418 pounds of food which equates to 334 meals. The employees are continuing to collect food throughout 2014 for those in need in our community.

Before we brought them a collection barrel, they built a fairy tale can castle.
disney can castle

Program Today Helps Nonprofits Across the Region

Originally posted in the Vacaville Reporter: I think we can all say we know the slight discomfort that comes between meals, so we can imagine what it would feel like to not be able to get the food you need when you want it. When people spend time learning about the issue of hunger and they understand that over 49 million Americans live in food insecure households, they realize this is a community problem we all need to work together to address.

By supporting the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano people can make a difference in the lives of hungry people in our community. People engage by donating food to us through our community food drives, volunteering at our warehouses or community events and helping to distribute food to people in need. People give their time and energy because they understand that the Food Bank is an effective organization, keeping our administrative and fund development costs to four cents out of every dollar. They also know that we can provide two meals for every dollar donated, showing a strong return because the community cares.

But it’s no great secret that an ongoing issue at every nonprofit organization is raising the money we must have to do our work. Less than 10% of our funding comes from the government; most comes from the community, with most of the community funds coming from individuals.

So many concerns face our community from hunger to environment and education to health. Given the need for all nonprofits to raise financial support, local foundations are working together through Give Local America to make a broad appeal for the support all nonprofits need. In order to be part of building a large community appeal, the Food Bank is participating in the Give Local America one-day fund raising effort on May 6. On a local basis, people can donate through the East Bay Community Foundation (eastbaygives.org) or through the Richmond Community Foundation (wegivecontracosta.org). At those sites, donors can give to the local charities that are participating in the drive. Other than credit card fees, all the money that is donated goes directly to the charity donors choose.

Give Local America came about in celebration of the 100th anniversary of community foundations in America and the vital role they have played developing and supporting local philanthropy. On May 6, 2014 from 12:00am – 11:59pm, you can check out real-time leaderboard to see how the Food Bank and any other favorite nonprofits are doing. Follow the conversation on Twitter and Facebook by using the #GiveLocalAmerica hashtag.

Give Local America is partnering with foundations and charities to increase the generosity of the community. We all believe people want to help make their community a better place to live. Supporting local nonprofits creates a stronger community for all our neighbors.

24 hours of Local Giving

By Food Bank Grants Coordinator, Neil Zarchin: May 6, 2014 is the Give Local America. Combining the resources of a national campaign with the heartfelt rewards of local charity, the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano has joined forces with three local Community Foundations to celebrate the Give Local America – known here as We Give.

Donors all across the country will be asked to support non-profits in their own communities in a celebration of generosity. Friends of the Food Bank can access our page through the Richmond Community Foundation at www.wegivecontracosta.org, the East Bay Community Foundation at www.eastbaygives.org.

Nonprofits representing all the best of what makes Contra Costa and Solano counties such great places to live will be represented on these websites. Naturally, we hope that you will choose the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano.

This will be the second celebration of the Give Local America. With the advent of internet commerce and social media, this could very well be the future of philanthropy. So get on board at the beginning and plan to visit one of the sites above and be a part of We Give.

Together we can solve hunger.

Shop for Your Favorite Cause

By Food Bank Data Base Coordinator Becky Bourdo: By shopping sites you already use like Amazon, eBay and Daily Good, a portion of your purchase can benefit the Food Bank! Keep reading to find out how easy it is to have your regular online activities benefit the Food Bank.

Amazon Smile

Fight hunger next time you shop Amazon by logging in through www.smile.amazon.com, then shop as usual. Amazon Foundation will donate 5% of your purchase price to Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano.

eBay Giving Works

Sell your item through eBay Giving works and 100% of every donation processed by PayPal Giving Fund reaches your chosen nonprofit. Start shopping and selling at www.givingworks.ebay.com.

Daily Good Search

Turn your daily web searching into food for the Food Bank. GoodSearch is powered by Yahoo, reviewed and recommended by Today, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and ABC News, and partners with over 100,000 large national organizations like The American Cancer Society, The Nature Conservancy, Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano, and more. For more information and to get started visit www.goodsearch.com.

Sparo Purchase with a Purpose

Sparo has partnered with many of buyers top selected and secure sites to allow online shoppers to donate a portion of their purchase to the charity of their choice during checkout.  Visit www.sparo.com to get started.

For questions or other ways to donate, please contact Marilu Boucher at mboucher@foodbankccs.org or call 925.676.7543 ext. 213

Donations Still Needed for Third Annual Faith Food Fridays’ Christmas Dinner Box and Toy Distribution

Guest Post: Faith Food Fridays founder and director Ben Buggs. This Friday, December 20th between 3 and 6pm, Faith Food Fridays will hold its third annual Christmas dinner box and toy distribution. The local food pantry that is supported by Faith Bible Church of Vallejo and the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano still needs donations of turkeys, chickens, hams and new or VERY gently used toys.

So far, 140 families have signed up – representing more than 400 children, between the ages of infants to 12 year of age, and we need your help.

We are anticipating a larger crowd than we had last year, based on how Thanksgiving went. Last year we served about 260 Thanksgiving dinners, this year it was 415. We believe that means our Christmas numbers will be greatly increased as well.

If you are able to donate, please drop off items at 901 Solano Ave. during business hours or across the street at 826 Solano Ave. on Thursday between 3-7pm. Monetary donations should be made out to “Faith Bible Church of Vallejo” with Faith Food Fridays on the memo line and dropped off or mailed to 901 Solano Ave., Vallejo, CA 94590.

Donations received so far have been meaningful, just last Sunday two gentlemen walked up during the church services with armloads of toys saying they wanted to ‘donate locally’ and had Googled the organization in order to help others as they had been helped in the past.

We are optimistic that we will be able to help everyone who shows up on Friday. We’re especially excited this time of year, to celebrate with our neighbors the birth of Jesus – since that’s the whole reason for the season.

Faith Food Fridays is located at 826 Solano Ave. More information can be found at www.faithfoodfridays.com or by calling (510) 978-2396.