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Archive for July, 2013

Farewell to the Event of the Summer

For thirteen years the Food Bank has celebrated An Afternoon in the Admiral’s Garden with many friends and supporters. The end of last month marked our final fundraiser at the Mare Island venue with the historic mansion as our backdrop.

The event was a rousing success, with generous guests and donors providing $140,000 that will enable us to provide 280,000 meals to people in need in the coming months. Guests jammed to the music of Big Cat Tolefree and the Hipnotics, engaged in bidding wars over silent and live auction items like trips, dinners and spa days. They sampled fine wine and food from local vendors before the gourmet lunch, which has been a tradition that never disappoints.

Thank you to all of the attendees, staff, sponsors and volunteers who have helped provide over 5.7 million meals by participating over the last thirteen years.  Those of you who completed our online survey by July 17 were entered into a drawing to win a $25 Safeway gift card. And the winner is… (drum roll)… Paul Clancy of Walnut Creek. Congratulations Paul!

Look for a new and exciting event from the Food Bank in the Fall of 2014.

Helping Prevent Childhood Hunger in Solano, Contra Costa Counties

Originally published in the Vacaville Reporter: Teachers know it’s difficult to educate a hungry child. Day-to-day, hungry students cannot focus and are not learning. Long term, students who do not eat well develop health problems caused by poor nutrition. To help students be healthy and ready to learn, the school lunch program makes sure every child in public school has a meal available to them every school day.

In order to continue this important program, a summer lunch program exists so that children can continue to get food year round. But budget cuts mean few schools actually have a summer school program, so children do not come to school each day causing participation in the summer lunch program to drop significantly. Both Contra Costa and Solano County school districts have responded in creative ways to continue providing meals to eligible children. Vacaville schools, for example, have a mobile lunch truck that takes meals to low-income housing areas, making it easy for children to get the food they need. While these systems help, overall results are a good news/bad news situation.

On the positive side, Contra Costa County has the 9th highest participation rate in the state of children who receive free and reduced price lunches continuing on the summer lunch program. Solano County does well too, having the 13th highest rate. The negative side is that Contra Costa only has 17 percent of the children participating and Solano only has 12 percent. Because of the suburban nature of our communities, we need to have a “place” where those in need can go to get the food they need. Schools are a common area where people trust those helping educate and care for their children. Investing in our schools provides a place to care for our children, both educationally and nutritionally.

Learn more about child hunger and ways you can help at www.foodbankccs.org/childhunger.

 

Breaking News: House Passes Farm Bill without SNAP

Last week, the House passed a Farm Bill without reauthorizing SNAP or any nutrition program, including TEFAP, by a vote of 216 to 208.

Our staff, along with Feeding America and other partners, weighed in with House members in opposition to splitting the bill in two and urged members to vote “no” on any bill that did not contain SNAP (this is the former food stamp program).  We will have a fight ahead of us to protect SNAP from cuts that would reduce or entirely eliminate benefits for needy families.

It remains to be seen whether the House will take up a nutrition bill, which would include funding for TEFAP (the program that supplies the Food Bank with food for our Food Assistance Program) and SNAP.  The results of the split could play out in three different ways (if you’re curious to learn more about the process, do not hesitate to call or email):

  1. The House could bring the nutrition title to the floor in the near future.  In this scenario, we would expect even deeper cuts to SNAP, as well as harmful policy changes such as a block grant.  Any bill that is passed would presumably be included as part of Farm Bill conference negotiations.  The Senate opposes separating the bill and would push for a single bill in conference.
  2. The House and Senate could move forward with a conference committee without passing the nutrition title in the House.  Because the Senate bill included a nutrition title, those programs would be part of conference negotiations.  While the Senate nutrition title of $4 billion in cuts to SNAP would be the starting point for negotiations, the House conferees would likely push for deeper SNAP cuts.
  3. House Leadership is also exploring the possibility of bringing up an entitlement reform bill later this year, which would include reforms and funding cuts to SNAP as well as other low-income programs like Medicaid.  While this bill would be dead-on-arrival in the Senate, the House could push to use this bill as the negotiation starting point for SNAP.

Regardless of how this plays out, a negotiated bill would need to pass both the House and Senate.  We will continue to work towards a Farm Bill that protects SNAP and the nation’s children, seniors, and working families. As this situation is obviously very fluid, we will need to be ready to weigh-in quickly once we have a better understanding of what the next steps will be, so stay tuned for more information.

Questions, please contact Lisa at lsherrill@foodbankccs.org or 925-771-1304.

USDA Announces Nutrition Standards for Snack Foods and Beverages Sold in Schools

Originally shared by FRAC – Today the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced its nutrition standards for all foods sold in school outside of the federal school lunch and breakfast programs, including cafeteria “a la carte” items, vending machines, and other snack foods, and beverages. These new standards are an important step to remedy nutritional shortfalls in our nation’s children’s diets and to help address the obesity crisis.

These new nutrition standards, consistent with the U.S. Dietary Guidelines, will promote the health of all school children throughout America. “Low-income children will especially benefit from these strong standards.” said FRAC President, Jim Weill. “When peer pressure and stigma drive low-income students to purchase less healthy  appealing competitive foods, instead of eating healthy school meals, they lose out nutritionally in a much bigger way than their more affluent peers, and their families lose financially,” said Weill.

The new regulations also implement the new requirement that schools make free drinking water available to children during meal times. “We were pleased to see improvements to the original proposed rules for water, including the extension of the requirement to offer free potable water to breakfast,” said Weill.

Moving forward with nutrition standards for all food sold in school and the provision of free drinking water for all students is an important step in the much-needed comprehensive overhaul of the school nutrition environment.